Overview
An uber vehicle

Introduction 

Our 2017 report “TNCs Today: A Profile of San Francisco Transportation Network Company Activity” provides the first comprehensive estimates of Uber and Lyft activity in the city. 

Key Findings

Trips per day: On a typical weekday, ride-hail vehicles make more than 170,000 vehicle trips within San Francisco, approximately 12 times the number of taxi trips, representing 15 percent of all intra-San Francisco vehicle trips.

Concentration downtown: Ride-hail trips are concentrated in the densest and most congested parts of San Francisco, including the downtown and northeastern core of the city. At peak periods, ride-hail vehicles are estimated to comprise 20-26 percent of vehicle trips in Downtown areas and the South of Market. At the other end of the range, ride-hail vehicles comprise 2-4 percent of peak vehicle trips in the southern and western part of the city.

Number of vehicles: On an average weekday, more than 5,700 ride-hail vehicles operate on San Francisco streets during the peak period. On Fridays, over 6,500 ride-hail vehicles are on the street at the peak.

Vehicle miles traveled: Ride-hail vehicles drive approximately 570,000 vehicle miles within San Francisco on a typical weekday. This accounts for 20 percent of all local daily vehicle miles traveled and includes both in-service and out-of-service mileage. Taken over total weekday vehicles miles traveled, which includes regional trips, local ride-hail trips account for an estimated 6.5 percent of total weekday vehicle miles traveled.

Geographic coverage: Ride-hail vehicles provide broader geographic coverage than taxis, though there appear to be lower levels of both types of trips in the south and southeast part of the city.

This data was compiled from November and December 2016. The report focused only on ride-hail trips made entirely within San Francisco.

Map

Explore a dynamic map of TNC activity in San Francisco, by time of day and day of the week.

Image
A screenshot of the map tool

Resources

Final report: TNCs Today, 2017 (PDF)

Press release (PDF)

Data file: TNC pickup/dropoff by Travel Analysis Zone (Excel)

Shapefile: San Francisco Travel Analysis Zones (ZIP)

Contact

Joe Castiglione, Deputy Director for Technology, Data and Analysis: joe.castiglione@sfcta.org

Drew Cooper, Senior Modeler: drew.cooper@sfcta.org

Background

Ride-hail companies such as Uber and Lyft are having an increasingly visible presence on San Francisco streets. But until now there has been little information to help the public and policy-makers understand the impact these services are having on our city.

The Transportation Authority and SFMTA are creating a series of reports that will answer key questions about ride-hail companies, also known as Transportation Network Companies, or TNCs. The first report, TNCs Today, describes the current characteristics of ride-hail companies in San Francisco, including the number, location, and timing of trips. Future reports will assess the existing regulatory landscape, best practices, and various impacts of ride-hail companies on:

  • Roadway Safety
  • Congestion
  • Transit Demand
  • Transit Operations
  • Equity
  • Disabled Access
  • Land Use and Curb Management

These reports will provide valuable data to help policy makers understand, assess and respond to these impacts as we work collectively to provide a range of transportation alternatives that will enhance mobility and reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reliance on private automobiles.  

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