Sales Tax Stories

See how sales tax dollars improve the city's transportation system.

Click on a face to see how people across San Francisco benefit from the half-cent sales tax for transportation.

The San Francisco County Transportation Authority has managed the voter-approved, half-cent sales tax since 1990.

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Mo Alkahim

Mo Alhakim

Masonic Avenue Streetscape Project

“The Masonic Avenue Streetscape Project has totally changed the neighborhood in a positive way. Now we see people coming with their kids to play and enjoy the new space.”

Mo Alhakim

Masonic Avenue Streetscape Project

What’s your connection to this project?

“I’m the owner of Mo’s Café which is located in the plaza very close to Masonic. I watched all three years of construction and had a front row seat to the improvements as they were implemented.”

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“The Masonic Avenue Streetscape Project has totally changed the neighborhood in a positive way. The project brought the area together, and continues to bring people to our neighborhood. Now we see people coming with their kids to play and enjoy the new space, especially on weekends. I’ve also noticed an increase in safety. Now the area feels more open and you can see people better. All the improvements are really great.”

About the project

The Masonic Avenue Streetscape Project is a community-led effort to improve safety for people walking, biking, taking transit, and driving on Masonic between Geary and Fell streets. 
 
Project improvements include reallocated road space to calm traffic, a dedicated raised green bike lane, new medians and sidewalk bulb-outs, bus boarding islands, repaving, more visible traffic signals, public art, wider sidewalks, better lighting, and a new public plaza. The project is a partnership between San Francisco Public Works and SFMTA.
 
The Transportation Authority supported the project with approximately $514,000 from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation.

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Winston Parsons

Winston Parsons

Geary Bus Rapid Transit

“This project has improved the reliability of a critical bus line and has helped restore people’s trust in transit.”

Winston Parsons

Geary Bus Rapid Transit

What’s your connection to this project?

“Years ago, I lived directly on Geary in the Richmond and used the bus often. I continue to use this bus line, either to go to work in the Outer Richmond, downtown, or to get to the East Bay. The 38 Geary line connects me to almost anywhere in the city and the region. It’s how I get to BART and other connections.”

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“Even though the first phase is still underway, I’ve already noticed that when I’m heading downtown in an area of the city with a dedicated transit lane, the bus does not get stuck in traffic as often, which is a huge deal. When you miss a connection in the Bay Area you can get set back 20 minutes or more and that adds up for the 50,000-plus riders. This project has improved the reliability of critical bus lines and has helped restore people’s trust in transit. People like knowing that they can rely on their bus.    
 
“I’ve also seen some exciting pedestrian improvements that have greatly improved the safety of crossing Geary Boulevard. I look forward to seeing additional safety improvements as many people who use the sidewalks and crosswalks are seniors and people with disabilities.”

About the project

Geary Bus Rapid Transit will improve Geary Boulevard with much-needed safety improvements and faster, more reliable bus service for the thousands of riders who use the 38 Geary and 38R Geary Rapid bus routes daily. 

Project improvements include red bus-only lanes, signal priority for buses, expanded rapid and local bus service, and a suite of safety improvements such as sidewalk extensions, accessible curb ramps, and protected left turn signals. Phase 1 comprising Market Street to Stanyan is currently under construction, with Phase 2 improvements for the western segment under design.

This project is led by the SFMTA in partnership with San Francisco Public Works and the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. The Transportation Authority led this project through the environmental planning phase in partnership with the SFMTA and is providing $52.9 million from the voter-approved half-cent sales tax, along with other local and regional funding. The Transportation Authority continues to provide project support and oversight.

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Mike Chen

Mike Chen

Lombard Street - U.S. 101 Corridor

“The traffic lights now give people walking across an intersection a head start over the cars so that they are more visible to people driving.”

Mike Chen

Lombard Street - U.S. 101 Corridor

What’s your connection to this project?

“I am a resident of the district and serve on SFMTA’s Citizens' Advisory Council. I often cross Lombard Street to get into the Marina.”

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“When I am walking at night, I get nervous about crossing Lombard Street because it’s a really wide street. As a pedestrian, you want people driving their cars to see you. The traffic lights now give people walking across an intersection a head start over the cars so that they are more visible to people driving. The crosswalks are also bigger and more noticeable. I’m very supportive of everything we can do to make things safer for people walking around.”

About the project

Lombard Street is a highly trafficked thoroughfare, with more than 40,000 vehicles and 80,000 pedestrians traveling on the street each day. Lombard Street is part of San Francisco’s Vision Zero High-Injury Network. 
 
San Francisco Public Works is leading this project in partnership with SFMTA, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, and Caltrans. Along with other regional funding, the Transportation Authority has contributed more than $646,000 from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation toward this project.

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Garrett Graham

Garrett Graham

Presidio Parkway

“With the completion of the Presidio Parkway improvements, the road is overall much safer…and my commute time is more enjoyable.”

Garrett Graham

Presidio Parkway

What’s your connection to this project?

“I’ve lived in Marin my whole life and have been commuting to the city for the past 12 years. During my drive, I cross the Golden Gate Bridge and travel down Presidio Parkway until I turn onto Lombard Street. Before this project was completed, movable pylons were used to determine which lanes could be used. The positioning of these pylons was not consistent, and it was a barrier that made it difficult to use this road as a regular commute path. Traffic often moved slowly during commute hours especially when the pylons were not repositioned to add extra lanes.”

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“With the completion of the Presidio Parkway Project, the road is overall much safer. The frequency of head-on collisions is greatly reduced, and my travel time is significantly smoother. Anyone who uses Presidio Parkway for commuting will feel a positive impact from these changes. It also feels much safer because it was built to withstand an earthquake.”

About the project

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Artists rendering of the Presidio Parkway
Artists rendering of the Presidio Parkway

The Presidio Parkway serves as a regional gateway between the Golden Gate Bridge and the City of San Francisco. The parkway was completed in 2015 and is a replacement of Doyle Drive, a 1.6-mile segment of U.S. 101 that had reached the end of its useful life after over 75 years of use.
 
Caltrans and the Transportation Authority jointly led the effort to replace Doyle Drive. 
 
The project was designed to improve traffic and seismic safety and improve access to the Presidio and Golden Gate National Recreation Area, while integrating with the surrounding landscape and facilitating the Presidio Tunnel Tops parks project.
 
The Transportation Authority provided almost $70 million in funding from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation.

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Michael Arcega

Michael Arcega

Broadway Streetscape Improvement

“The most rewarding thing for me is that almost as soon as we installed the benches, people were enjoying them.”

Michael Arcega

Broadway Streetscape Improvement

What’s your connection to this project?

“I was pleased to be selected as the artist to create sculptural seating elements for the Broadway Streetscape Project. I wanted to create work that was native to the area, meaning it was inspired by local signifiers. As I visited the area and studied the surroundings, I observed cloud images throughout the local restaurants and the Asian Art Museum. From these image collections, I chose a few that translated best into seating elements for this project.”
 

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“It is wonderful to see public art that functions as a social object. The Broadway sculptural seating not only references the clouds that are so symbolic to the culture of the district, but also represents a prominent feature of San Francisco: the fog. The most rewarding thing for me is that almost as soon as we installed the benches, the neighborhood people were using them to relax and enjoy themselves. I love seeing older people in the community take breaks to chat with one another and seeing tourists take selfies—it really shows that the cultural richness of the district is appreciated by all who pass through.”
 

About the project

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One of Michael Arcega's benches on Broadway Street
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This project is a long-time effort that began with the community's vision for a safer, more livable neighborhood. Improvements include a reconfigured roadway to calm traffic, new concrete sidewalks, freshly planted trees, new bus shelters and curbside bus bulbs, new pedestrian-scale lighting, and decorative crosswalks.
 
The project showcases functional public art featuring benches with designs inspired by cloud imagery. 
 
The Transportation Authority provided about $2.5 million in funding from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation toward this project, along with other local and regional funds.

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Randall Scott

Randall Scott

Jefferson Streetscape

“We at the Community Benefit District know what pedestrianization does for an area. It increases visibility and boosts business. With the Jefferson Streetscape project, we’ve seen a significant rise in pedestrian traffic at Fisherman’s Wharf.”

Randall Scott

Jefferson Streetscape

What’s your connection to this project?

“Fisherman’s Wharf Community Benefit District has been key to the development of the Jefferson Streetscape project. We at the Community Benefit District know what pedestrianization does for an area: It boosts business, increases visibility, and helps people travel safely on sidewalks. In a tourist area like Fisherman’s Wharf, this is key.”

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“We’ve seen a big boost in attendance at Fisherman’s Wharf, and significant increases overall, in pedestrian counts in this area. We feel the Jefferson Street improvements have made it more comfortable for pedestrians to walk to the Wharf. My team continues to monitor the pedestrian counts in our area and we expect foot traffic to continue to increase over time.”

About the project

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A street view of Jefferson street including an F streetcar
Photo credit: Thomas Hawk, flic.kr/p/27qMw6X

The Jefferson Streetscape Improvement Project aims to improve street safety on the main street of Fisherman’s Wharf. The project was envisioned in the Fisherman’s Wharf Public Realm Plan and is being implemented in two phases.

The first phase of the Jefferson Streetscape Improvement Project, completed in 2013, widened sidewalks and constructed decorative pavement from Jones Street to Hyde Street with the goal of slowing vehicle traffic and safely accommodating high volumes of pedestrians and bicyclists. 

The second phase will result in three blocks of streetscape improvements between Powell and Jones streets. The project includes widened sidewalks, pedestrian scale lighting, bike parking, new landscaping, trees, public seating, and construction of a narrowed roadway with geometrically patterned pavement. The project will improve safety along a street that sees more than 60,000 pedestrians per day on a typical summer weekend. 

The Jefferson Streetscape Improvement Project is being implemented by San Francisco Public Works in coordination with the SFMTA and the Port of San Francisco. The Transportation Authority provided $1.4 million in funding from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation, along with other local and state funding.
 

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Ana Santandreu

Ana Santandreu

Chinatown pedestrian scramble

“I love the convenience of having scrambles and I think they are efficient because they help pedestrians get to where they need to go faster.”

Ana Santandreu

Chinatown pedestrian scramble

What’s your connection to this project?

“I go across this scramble (at Sacramento and Stockton streets) quite a bit since I live in the neighborhood and enjoy walking around the streets of San Francisco. I love the convenience of having scrambles and I think they are efficient because they help pedestrians get to where they need to go faster. They are like a courtesy for pedestrians and make the city more walkable.”
 

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“It seems to me that this scramble has improved the flow of pedestrians, and people certainly like to use it. I think it has also made people who are driving  more aware of pedestrians in the area. In general, it would be great to have more scrambles since San Francisco has a lot of complex intersections.”

About the project

Kearny Street is a busy street in San Francisco’s Financial District, travelled by buses, cars, people walking, and people biking. The street has been identified as a Vision Zero High-Injury Corridor, indicating a high number of severe injuries or fatalities to people using the street.
 
The SFMTA-led District 3 Pedestrian Safety Improvements project will implement pedestrian scramble signals at the intersections of Kearny and Jackson streets and Kearny and Washington streets. (A pedestrian scramble is a type of traffic signal that stops all vehicular traffic, allowing pedestrians to cross an intersection in every direction, including diagonally, at the same time.)

The Transportation Authority provided $919,800 in funding toward planning and construction of the pedestrian scrambles at Kearny/Jackson and Kearny/Washington and related work from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation.
 

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Justin Wiley

Justin Wiley

Lower Great Highway Pedestrian Improvements

“The traffic calming measures in place on the Lower Great Highway have been incredibly helpful in safely getting people to the Upper Great Highway and the beach.”

Justin Wiley

Lower Great Highway Pedestrian Improvements

What’s your connection to this project?

“I am a long-time resident of San Francisco and I currently live in the Sunset. I visit the Lower Great Highway about three to five times a week when I am running, walking, or riding a bike.”

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“During shelter in place, I have been crossing the Lower Great Highway to get to the Upper Great Highway even more than usual since it is currently closed to cars and it offers a great way to get exercise while still feeling safe. The traffic calming measures in place on the Lower Great Highway have been incredibly helpful in safely getting people to the Upper Great Highway and the beach. Prior to these traffic calming measures, there were a lot of cars speeding through the area which was a barrier for all of the people trying to get to the beach. With the traffic calming measures in place, I feel a bit more relaxed and enjoy my time at the beach better.”
 

About the project

The goal of SFMTA’s Lower Great Highway Pedestrian Improvements Project is to increase pedestrian safety and comfort by installing traffic calming measures and pedestrian improvements. The traffic calming measures installed include intersection daylighting, painted safety zones, back-in angled parking, medians, stop signs, speed tables, and updated roadway striping. The Transportation Authority supported this project with $250,000 in funding from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation.
 

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Brandon Cruz

Brandon Cruz

Kirkham Street pavement renovation

“The street repaving has made the area look nicer and more maintained.”

Brandon Cruz

Kirkham pavement renovation

What’s your connection to this project?

“I have lived in the Sunset for several years, just a few blocks away from Kirkham Street. I walk, bike, and drive on Kirkham street often.”

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“The street repaving has made the area look nicer and more maintained. It is also smoother to drive on. I know they replaced the standard crosswalks in the area with continental crosswalks and that has improved safety for people walking in the area.”

About the project

The Kirkham Street Pavement Renovation project focused on 32 blocks of Kirkham Street, a total distance of about 1.8 miles. San Francisco Public Works repaved the street, constructed 210 curb ramps, and replaced standard crosswalks in the area with continental crosswalks. The Transportation Authority supported this project with $4.5 million in voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation funding.

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Sofia Perel

Sofia Perel

Inner Sunset Traffic Calming

“The new pedestrian islands have improved safety for drivers and pedestrians because it’s more clearly marked where the pedestrians are.”

Sofia Perel

Inner Sunset Traffic Calming

What’s your connection to this project?

“I’ve been a resident of the Inner Sunset area for about about five years now. I take Muni in and out of the area. I like to go shopping along the Irving corridor, Judah, and 9th Ave.” 

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“Before the pedestrian islands, I would always get nervous whenever I would be driving next to the N Judah because I didn't know where pedestrians would be coming out or if they had a designated area. The new pedestrian islands have improved safety for drivers and pedestrians because it’s more clearly marked where the pedestrians are.”

About the project

The Inner Sunset Traffic Calming Project installed pedestrian islands and sidewalk bulb-outs in the Inner Sunset area. The Transportation Authority supported this project with funding from the voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation.

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Frances Macalalad

Frances Macalalad

Raised crosswalks in Golden Gate Park

“Since the installation of these roadway improvements, I feel a lot safer when I walk my dog in this area.”

Frances Macalalad

Raised crosswalks in Golden Gate Park

What’s your connection to this project?

“My partner and I walk our dog in Golden Gate Park often and we first noticed the raised crosswalk a few months ago. It forces cars to slow down and stop for foot traffic. Since the installation of these roadway improvements, I feel a lot safer when I walk my dog in this area.”

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“Safety is a big factor in motivating people to go outside and be active. The installation of raised crosswalks has improved the feeling of the neighborhood significantly and it makes pedestrians and bicyclists feel more confident about sharing the road with vehicles. As pedestrian safety in the neighborhood improves, we will likely see more and more people enjoying the outdoors.”

About the project

Golden Gate Park is visited by 13 million people each year. The Golden Gate Park Traffic Safety Project aims to reduce vehicle speeds and better manage traffic in the park by implementing 50 traffic calming devices and minor traffic modifications throughout the park. Improvements include speed humps, speed tables, raised crosswalks, a one-way conversion on 30th Avenue, and corridor striping improvements on John F Kennedy Drive.

SFMTA and the San Francisco Recreation and Parks Department are partnering on this project. The Transportation Authority supported this project with $580,926 in funding from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation.

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Ryan Jackson

Ryan Jackson

Vision Zero Freeway Ramps

“Now, people can travel on 8th Street with less stress and more freedom.”

Ryan Jackson

Vision Zero Ramps

What’s your connection to this project?

“I live on 11th Street in the SoMa District. Our area is rich with amenities and destinations of interest, so vehicle traffic is heavy. I travel by bike near the 7th and 8th Street on/off ramps regularly to get to my job in Bayview."

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“The improvements to the 8th Street on/off ramps were significant for pedestrians and bicyclists because now we feel a sense of separation from the vehicle traffic. The protected bikeway offers direct protection for people traveling on a bike, but it also offers more space for pedestrians. The constant anxiety of a collision with a vehicle makes biking and walking less fun. Now, people can travel on 8th Street with less stress and more freedom.  
 
“We’re also excited about the prospect of adding pedestrian crosswalks. The Transportation Authority conducted public outreach meetings to show us what the crosswalks would look like and how they will increase safety. The response was very positive. All of us in the neighborhood appreciate the agency’s efforts to implement changes that directly reflect our needs. We look forward to the implementation of similar upgrades on 7th Street.”

About the project

There are many intersections in San Francisco’s South of Market neighborhood where freeway on- or off-ramps intersect city streets. Many of these ramps are located close to public schools, single room occupancy hotels, and senior centers, which are frequented by populations at high risk of injury from traffic collisions. 

The Transportation Authority conducted two studies to understand how to improve safety at 15 SoMa intersections with support from Caltrans and the SFMTA, and funding from San Francisco’s voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation. Six of the intersections we studied cross 7th and 8th streets. The goal of these studies is to improve safety for all travelers, especially vulnerable users, and to support progress towards achieving Vision Zero.

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Deon Hua

Deon Hua

Vision Zero Quick-Build Initiative

“I appreciate the overall vision for more bike lanes and bike safety in our city. Quick-build projects are an excellent way to implement quick safety fixes that will help us get to more permanent solutions in the future.”

Deon Hua

Vision Zero Quick-Build Initiative

What’s your connection to this project?

“I live in San Francisco and my primary modes of travel are biking and BART. I’ve been a regular traveler on both Howard and Valencia before and after the Quick-Build projects. I spend most of my time on Howard Street, as I work on Howard and use it to commute with my bike.”

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“Howard and Valencia are very different now that the Quick-Build projects have been implemented. There are fewer cars blocking the lane and there is more protection in the bike lanes. I also noticed better traffic signaling for bikes along those corridors. I’m looking forward to more potential permanent solutions, including planters and better concrete. I appreciate the overall vision for more bike lanes and bike safety in our city. Quick-Build projects are an excellent way to implement quick safety fixes that will help us get to more permanent solutions in the future.”

About the project

“Quick-Build” projects are focused on safety improvements to the High Injury Network, the 13% of city streets that account for 75% of severe and fatal injuries. Quick-Builds allow near-term implementation of safety improvements while longer-term infrastructure improvements are designed. The Transportation Authority has allocated $5.2 million in funding from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation to SFMTA for the Vision Zero Quick-Build Program.

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Joan Byrne

Joan Byrne

19th Avenue Traffic Signals

“I’m glad that the upgraded traffic signals now have a transit prioritization feature so that there is a way for the buses to get through the lights without having to wait too long.”

Joan Byrne

19th Avenue Signals

What’s your connection to this project?

“I have lived in the Richmond district for over 40 years now. I live right off Park Presidio Boulevard. I work at the Stonestown Galleria, which is right down 19th Avenue, and I drive or take the bus there everyday.”
 

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“I’m glad that the upgraded traffic signals now have a transit prioritization feature so that there is a way for the buses to get through the lights without having to wait too long. Enabling the traffic signals to communicate better with each other is also great because I know a lot of times you get stuck at lights as a driver and so you try to rush to a green light. So making the traffic signals sync better with one another will create a better traffic situation for drivers. I am also really excited about the new ADA-compliant curb ramps because I have people in my life who need things like that. It is really hard when you are with somebody in a wheelchair and you can’t get around smoothly. Anything we can do for that is really helpful as well. I appreciate this kind of work being done, it’s very thoughtful.”
 

About the project

The 19th Avenue Signals Project is upgrading traffic signals to count down for pedestrians, improving signal visibility for vehicles, relocating poles, installing new equipment to allow for transit prioritization, and installing ADA-compliant curb ramps. The SFMTA and Caltrans partnered on this project. The Transportation Authority allocated $8.7 million from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation for this project.

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Erica Levine

Erica Levine

Twin Peaks Connectivity

“The fact that this project has removed cars from a substantial area of really nice recreational space has been a huge improvement for pedestrian safety.”
 

Erica Levine

Twin Peaks Connectivity

What’s your connection to this project?

“I have lived in Noe Valley for five years now. I am an avid runner and walker, and I often end up at Twin Peaks.”
 

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“I've been super supportive of the project. One of the tough things about living in the city, especially when you go running, is that you have to be extra careful about making sure that drivers see you and you have to make sure that they won’t roll through a stop. The fact that this project has removed cars from a substantial area of really nice recreational space has been a huge improvement for pedestrian safety.”
 

About the project

Twin Peaks is a world-famous tourist destination with several trails for people to enjoy the undeveloped natural area. The Twin Peaks Connectivity Project repurposed a portion of the existing roadway from vehicle use to pedestrian and bicycle use. It also created safer connections to Twin Peaks Trail System, improved pedestrian and bicycle access, and provided a defined connection to the Bay Area Ridge Trail. The project was sponsored by the San Francisco Recreation and Parks Department in partnership with the SFMTA and San Francisco Public Works. The Transportation Authority allocated $23,000 to this project from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation.

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Larry Kenney

Larry Kenney

Eureka St., Grandview Ave., and Mangels Ave. Pavement Renovation

“The repaved streets are a lot better for the neighborhood.”

Larry Kenney

Eureka St., Grandview Ave., and Mangels Ave. Pavement Renovation

What’s your connection to this project?

“I have lived in the same location since 1982 at the corner of 21st and Eureka. I actually watched the project being done from my window.”
 

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“The streets used to be torn up but once they were done repaving, it was beautiful. The repaved streets are a lot better for the neighborhood. New sidewalk and ADA curb ramps were also installed which makes it easier for people to get around.”
 

About the project

The Eureka Street, Grandview Avenue, and Mangels Avenue Pavement Renovation repaved approximately 47 blocks. San Francisco Public Works installed new sidewalks, driveways, curbs, gutters, and ADA curb ramps. The Transportation Authority allocated $4,785,750 in funding from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation for this project.

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Yu Chen Hou

Yu Chen Hou

Valencia Bike Lanes

“Drivers are generally more aware of bikes now, and cyclists feel much safer.”

Yu Chen Hou

Valencia Bike Lanes

What’s your connection to this project?

“I live in the Mission and work downtown. I bike to work almost every day and use the Valencia corridor. I moved to the area just a couple of years ago and didn’t bike much before that.” 
 

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“There have been many improvements to Valencia since I moved to the City, including protected bike lanes. Drivers are generally more aware of bikes now, and cyclists feel much safer. There has also been a significant increase in people riding bikes in the area because it feels more inviting to cyclists. Having more bike lanes in the city is something I’m really looking forward to. The Valencia Street project is a great model for how we should approach bike infrastructure in the rest of the city.”

About the project

A vibrant commercial corridor, Valencia Street is one of San Francisco’s most heavily used biking corridors. The City has heard increasing community concern about traffic safety, conflicts, and congestion on Valencia. 

The Valencia Bikeway Improvements project identified bikeway design options to upgrade the existing bike lanes given the high volume of cyclists on Valencia Street, history of bicycle-motor vehicle crashes, and parking and loading conflicts within the bike lane.

The Transportation Authority supported this project with $145,000 in funding from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation.

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Ulli Palmbach

Ulli Palmbach

Bartlett Streetscape Improvements

“I think it is a great idea to create places where people can be outside.”

Ulli Palmbach

Bartlett Streetscape Improvements

What’s your connection to this project?

“I have lived at my current home on Bartlett Street for 35 years. I am an artist and a gardener. I have installed several gardening projects on my block to make my neighborhood more beautiful.”

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“I think it is a great idea to create places where people can be outside. That’s why I do my gardening work. The pergola structures are used to host outdoor markets where my neighbors can meet each other. I am happy that they also added street trees and sidewalk gardens to make the area more beautiful. The new lighting adds a certain amount of safety which is always important.”

About the project

San Francisco Public Works’ Bartlett Streetscape Improvements Project created a public space designed to be used for farmer’s markets and community events. Vendors can set up their stands under the new permanent pergolas that provide shade during the day and lighting at night. The project installed new roadway paving, wider sidewalks, new lighting speed tables, and bike parking. It also added street trees and sidewalk gardens. The Transportation Authority supported this effort with $400,000 in funding from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation.

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Sol McKinney

Sol McKinney

Bike share

“Biking is my preferred mode of travel for work and leisure activities around the city and the bikeshare program provides added convenience that is key to my quality of life.”

Sol McKinney

Bike share

What’s your connection to this project?

“I was born and raised in San Francisco. I’ve always preferred alternative modes to driving and have used my work-sponsored bike share program for over a year now. Biking is my preferred mode of travel for work and leisure activities around the city. I like the convenience of a loaned bike system so I do not have to worry about the security of my own bike.”

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“My job is just three miles away from my home. Driving through my neighborhood to get to work would take 30-40 minutes. With a bike, it takes just 15 minutes. Bike share is a huge time saver for me. I also enjoy the added exercise I get during the workday. I’d love to see this program expand its service area and include bikes with more seating and cargo space for those commuting with children.”

About the project

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Bikes docked at a Bay Wheels bikeshare station

The Transportation Authority produced a Strategic Analysis Report funded by $35,000 from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation that informed the path forward for governance and financial sustainability of the bike share system.

SFMTA has partnered with public and private agencies to make sure bike share becomes accessible for people throughout San Francisco. SFMTA manages the review and permitting process for both station-based and stationless operators, works with private operators to plan and deliver service, and manages and enforces all the necessary contracts and permits.

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Shruti Swamy

Shruti Swamy

Folsom Bike Lanes and Green Wave

“I’m grateful to have this improved infrastructure on Folsom. I don’t know if I'd be cycling as much as I do if Folsom wasn’t so great.”

Shruti Swamy

Folsom Bike Lanes and Green Wave

What’s your connection to this project?

“I live about one block away from Folsom and it serves as my main connection to the City. I use it daily to run errands like grocery shopping. Over the past decade, I’ve cycled all over the city. But now that I am the mom of a 15-month-old baby, I am more careful about the streets I ride on. I go out of my way to use Folsom because it feels safe and bicycle friendly.” 

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“The new infrastructure that separates the bicycle lane from the rest of the traffic made a huge difference. It also really connects the rest of the city to our neighborhood and it feels so much safer for everyone. I don’t know if I would be cycling as much as I do without these improvements.”

About the project

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A green wave sign on Folsom Street

The Transportation Authority provided $294,000 from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation to SFMTA for bike lane striping and San Francisco Public Works for related streetscape improvements on Folsom.

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Sam Kwan

Sam Kwan

Walking School Bus

“Urban Ed has been hosting a walking school bus since September 2019 and they were able to reduce truancy by 30% by February 2020.”

Sam Kwan

Walking School Bus

What’s your connection to this project?

“I work for Walk San Francisco and I am a Safe Routes to School Community Engagement Team Member. The Safe Routes to School Partnership is managed by the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency and involves four nonprofit partners and four City agencies.  We first heard about Malcolm X’s walking school bus and we began supporting the students and leaders with snacks in January 2020 as part of our community engagement work with schools in the southeast [neighborhoods]. As soon as schools open up again, we plan to host a Walking School Bus training on Malcolm X’s campus to help gain more traction on their efforts and open up this opportunity district wide.

“The Safe Routes to School Program uses our customized Walking School Bus training to get other parents to see that this is possible. Safe Routes to School is here to provide all the tools and support to get them up and rolling. This year, we're also going to be focusing on a week's worth of activities for parents and kids to get out, get moving, and incorporate more daily activity in their lives especially when we are all online learning and not in the classroom.”

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“One of the parents whose daughter is picked up in the morning by the walking school bus says that she found herself having more time in the morning to care for her younger child and having extra time to get ready for the day. The walking school bus at Malcolm X built a stronger network of staff, students, and parents. Students participating in the walking school bus look forward to walking to school as they talk about their family and school life, sing songs, wave to their teachers in the morning, play on the playground, and hang out with their friends.”

About the project

A walking school bus is a group of children who are led by one or more adults from their home to school. A walking school bus program can increase safety, promote exercise and socializing, while decreasing pollution by reducing the need for driving. 

In some neighborhoods, like Chinatown and the Excelsior, walking school buses meet at parks near schools and children walk together as a large group.

The Transportation Authority supports the Safe Routes to School program administration with annual funding from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation. 

The Safe Routes to School program includes the implementation of Walking School Buses citywide and is a partnership between City agencies and nonprofit partners, including the SFMTA, San Francisco Unified School District, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco Department of the Environment, San Francisco Bicycle Coalition, Tenderloin Safe Passage, Walk San Francisco, and YMCA’s YBike Program, among other partners.

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Jose Barajas

Jose Barajas

Hairball Improvements (junction of U.S.101/Cesar Chavez Street)

“The pathway improvements at the Hairball intersection have made travel for pedestrians and bicyclists much safer. Now lanes are more clearly marked and I see more people using it.”

Jose Barajas

Hairball Improvements (junction of U.S.101/Cesar Chavez Street)

What’s your connection to this project?

“I live in a neighborhood near the Hairball and drive though this intersection on almost a daily basis to visit friends in the Mission or go downtown.”

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“One of the most significant improvements is the implementation of green lanes for bicyclists and pedestrians. There was an existing pathway off Cesar Chavez that was really unsafe for people because of heavy traffic. Now the lanes are more clearly marked and the path seems wider which provides a lot more space for pedestrians and bicyclists. There is also nice landscaping in some areas that provides a buffer between non-motorized travel and vehicles. Since the improvements were implemented, there’s been a significant increase in people who use the pathway.”

About the project

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A high-level view of the Hairball

Several street safety improvements were added to “the Hairball,” a busy intersection at the juncture of U.S. 101 and Cesar Chavez Street between Potrero Hill and the Mission neighborhoods. Every day, thousands of people walk, bike, and drive through this complex arrangement of streets where Potrero Avenue, Cesar Chavez Street, Bayshore Boulevard, and Highway 101 meet. Proposed improvements include widened sidewalks, new and improved bike lanes, and new street lighting. 

The Transportation Authority funded these improvements with $1.6 million in funding from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation. The SFMTA and San Francisco Public Works led planning and construction.

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Alexander Mullaney

Alexander Mullaney

BART Balboa Park Station Multimodal Connections

“I often walk, bike or take the K Line to the Balboa BART station. The Balboa Park Eastside project has improved this area significantly.”

Alexander Mullaney

BART Balboa Park Station Multimodal Connections

What’s your connection to this project?

“I live on Ocean Avenue, about one-half mile west of the Balboa station. I often walk, bike, or take the K Line to the Balboa BART station. During the design phase of the Balboa Park Eastside Project, I attended some community meetings.”

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“The project has improved this area significantly. The K Line bus stop is the biggest improvement because now you can easily take the bus directly, and comfortably, to the BART station. The new access on the Ocean Avenue side of the street allows people to cut in and go directly to the Ocean Avenue gate of the BART station, improving safety and saving time for commuters. The new light fixtures are also a significant improvement. The added light is great and the streamlined pyramid design of the fixtures prevents pigeons from perching. Pigeons have been a huge issue for this area in the past and the new light fixtures have proven to be a simple yet thoughtful solution.”

About the project

The Balboa Park BART/Muni Station is one of the busiest transit hubs in San Francisco. Access to the station is complicated by the convergence of BART with K and L Muni lines, people walking and biking, and six freeway ramps tying into the local street network directly adjacent to the station.

The Transportation Authority released the Balboa Park Circulation Study in 2014, with recommendations to reduce conflicts among differ­ent types of users at several locations in the station area, improve pe­destrian and bicycle conditions while balancing vehicle operational needs, and be of a cost and scope that would allow implementation within the next 10 years.

Since then, the Transportation Authority has allocated $6.8 million in funding from San Francisco's voter-approved, half-cent sales tax for transportation to BART and SFMTA for a variety of projects to help improve access to the busy and tightly constrained station.

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Brian Shaw

Brian Shaw

Caltrain Electrification

“We want to have more people travel downtown via Caltrain because that helps the neighborhood be less congested and allows more people to access the area without a car.”

Brian Shaw

Caltrain Electrification

What’s your connection to this project?

"As a San Francisco resident in my community, the electrification will allow full development of the Salesforce Transit Center. We want to have more people travel downtown via Caltrain because that helps the neighborhood be less congested and allows more people to access the area without a car. I also manage parking and transportation at Stanford University. For Stanford, Caltrain Electrification is better because it gives people options to get around the Peninsula without driving."

How will the project improve the area/neighborhood?

"You have to look at it from different layers. Caltrain electrification will allow people to make better connections to BART and Muni and allows people to make longer and more frequent transit trips. It also gives options to people who can’t, or don’t want to, drive. For employers, it will allow them to grow and not have traffic impacts because it gets more cars off the road. In the community where I live in San Francisco, it will allow this area to be the Grand Central Station of the West."

About the project

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A Caltrain vehicle headed to San Francisco

The Caltrain Electrification project is expected to be complete in 2022 and will bring fully electrified service to Caltrain. Electrification improvements include converting diesel-hauled trains to electric trains, increasing service to six trains per peak hour per direction, and maintaining an operating speed of up to 79 mph.

The primary purpose of Caltrain electrification is to improve Caltrain system performance and curtail long-term environmental impacts by reducing noise, improving regional air quality, and lowering greenhouse gas emissions.

The Transportation Authority has contributed $37 million to support Caltrain electrification from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation and other local funding.

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Yohannes Yetbarek

Yohannes Yetbarek

Salesforce Transit Center

“I appreciate the careful planning that went into creating this much-needed transit terminal for San Francisco.”

Yohannes Yetbarek

Salesforce Transit Center

What’s your connection to this project?

“The new Terminal is a first-rate transit hub, and just a really nice place to hang out. The whole area surrounding it has changed in a positive way too. There are several impressive new buildings and infrastructure. I appreciate the careful planning that went into creating this much-needed transit terminal for San Francisco.”

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

“One of the greatest improvements to the area is the added pedestrian signals on the streets surrounding the terminal. The streets in this neighborhood have a lot of pedestrian traffic and with the new countdown signals and updated signal hardware, pedestrian safety is greatly improved at several intersections.”

About the project

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Aerial view of the Salesforce Transit Center. Photo credit: Sergio Ruiz https://flic.kr/p/29vYNvg
Photo credit: Sergio Ruiz, flic.kr/p/29vYNvg

The Salesforce Transit Center is San Francisco’s newly rebuilt regional transit hub and public park.

The multi-level building features a 5.4-acre rooftop park, terminal facilities for multiple local and regional bus systems, art installations, retail shops, restaurants, a gym, pop-up shops, and more. The transit center accommodates more than 100,000 passengers each weekday and up to 45 million people per year.

The Salesforce Transit Center is located south of Mission Street, between Second and Beale streets, in downtown San Francisco. The transit center replaced the seismically deficient Transbay Terminal, which opened in 1939 and was located at First and Mission streets.

The Transbay Joint Powers Authority has overseen planning, design, and construction of the Salesforce Transit Center and manages its operations. The facility houses 11 transit systems: AC Transit, BART, Caltrain, Golden Gate Transit, Greyhound, Muni, SamTrans, WestCAT Lynx, Amtrak, Paratransit, and future High-Speed Rail. 

The Transportation Authority provided over $200 million toward the transit center and Caltrain/High-Speed Rail Connections from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation.
 

Learn more

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Chris Arvin

Chris Arvin

New Muni Light Rail Vehicles

“The new Muni light rail vehicles have improved transit significantly in my neighborhood. The ride is much more comfortable and spacious.”

Chris Arvin

New Muni Light Rail Vehicles

What’s your connection to this project?

"I live on the N Judah line and ride the Muni every day of the week and on weekends. The Muni light rail vehicle project has made a big impact on my day-to-day life because it has improved the comfort and convenience of my connection to work and recreational destinations like Ocean Beach, Embarcadero, and the park."

How has the project improved the area/neighborhood?

"The new Muni Light Rail Vehicles have improved transit significantly in my neighborhood. The ride is much more comfortable and spacious. Even during peak commute hours there is more standing room, which is a huge improvement. The new digital destination signage is very helpful because it is easy to see where you are on the route and when to pull the cord to request a stop. I look forward to seeing more new Muni Light Rail Vehicles in San Francisco."
 

About the project

The new Muni light rail vehicles are more reliable, safer, and more comfortable for both operators and passengers. They feature improved interior design that increases potential standing capacity, upgraded passenger information, and easier to maintain door and step units.

The Transportation Authority has provided over $190 million in voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation toward the purchase of new Muni light rail vehicles.
 

Learn more

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Jane Redmond

Jane Redmond

Paratransit

“I’m really grateful to have the San Francisco Paratransit Program. It’s absolutely essential to my independence and my happiness.”

Jane Redmond

Paratransit

What’s your connection to this project?

"I use the San Francisco Paratransit Program every day. It’s my lifeline. With this program I am able to live my life, do all the errands I need to do, and go out with friends. It’s absolutely essential to my independence and my happiness. Paratransit is also very reliable. They have established schedules and they stick to it."

How has the project improved the area/community?

"I became eligible for the Paratransit Program in 2006 and since then it has become my life support. I use it for grocery shopping, going to doctor appointments, and meetings. I’ve helped several people fill out the forms to become eligible for this program. I’m really grateful for the San Francisco Paratransit Program. It serves the entire disabled community and I’m proud to serve on the Paratransit Coordinating Council. It’s my way to give back." 

About the project

SF Paratransit is a service of SFMTA that provides van and taxi services to people with disabilities who are unable to use public transit independently. Every year, SF Paratransit provides about 800,000 passenger trips for approximately 14,000 registered clients.

The Transportation Authority allocates approximately $10.2 million annually in San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation funding for the paratransit program.

Learn more

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Emma Gonzalez

Emma Gonzalez

Rehabilitated Vintage Streetcars

“There is an element of nostalgia when operating a historic vehicle. I feel like a movie star!”

Emma Gonzalez

Rehabilitated Vintage Streetcars

What’s your connection to this project?

“I have been a light rail operator for 21 years, since 1998. Now I operate the new Light Rail Vehicles, but also do the historic street cars as well.”   

What is the benefit of this investment?

“I love operating the historic vehicles. There’s an element of nostalgia when operating a historic vehicle. I feel like a movie star! It’s fun to see everyone stop to take a picture of the vehicle you’re operating.” 

About the project

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Historic streetcar under repair

The Transportation Authority has allocated a total of $3 million in San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation funding to SFMTA for rehabilitation of 11 historic streetcars originally used by New Jersey Transit, and for the rehabilitation of five vintage streetcars. The allocations improved safety, reliability, and service. Part of the rehabilitation focused on upgrading the vehicles to meet the Americans with Disabilities Act requirements.

View this project in MyStreetSF

 

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Telesia Telsee

Telesia Telsee

New Muni Light Rail Vehicles

“It is very important that I get to my destinations safely and with the new LRV4 trains, I see everything from where I sit.”

Telesia Telsee

New Muni Light Rail Vehicles

What’s your connection to this project?

“I have been a light rail operator since 2007. I like the new light rail vehicles for a variety of reasons, but the most important improvement is the Train Operating Display which is located at the front of the train and allows me to easily see and control everything related to the train’s operations. Every issue and the location of that issue is clearly visible on the Train Operating Display. These improvements save a lot of time and effort for a train operator. They also contribute to increased safety, as I can see and control everything from where I sit.”

What are the benefits for riders?

“Riders receive clear verbal and written announcements about where they are, which makes things easier for everyone, especially those who are hearing impaired. Also, there is significantly more standing room in the trains. One new light rail car can hold as many people standing as two of the older Breda cars. I rarely have to leave people behind because of lack of space. This is a big improvement for riders and for operators.” 

About the project

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A new Muni light rail vehicle on Duboce Street
Photo credit: SFMTA Photography Department

The new Muni light rail vehicles are more reliable, safer, and more comfortable for both operators and passengers. They feature improved interior design that increases potential standing capacity, upgraded passenger information, and easier to maintain door and step units.

This project will take place in two phases, an fleet expansion phase followed by a vehicle replacement phase. 

The Transportation Authority has provided over $190 million in voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation toward the purchase of new Muni light rail vehicles, our single largest capital investment ever.

Learn more

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Mouneissa Wangara

Mouneissa Wangara

New Muni buses

“The new buses are great! They are cleaner, the seats are more comfortable, and most importantly, I feel safer when riding on them.”

Mouneissa Wangara

New Muni buses

What’s your connection to this project?

"I work in the Mission District and regularly use Muni to run errands for work. The new buses have significantly improved how I travel around San Francisco."
 

How has this project improved your commuting experience?

"The new buses are great! They are cleaner, the seats are more comfortable, and most importantly, I feel safer when riding on them. The new buses also offer easier access for people with mobility challenges. I’m very happy that SFCTA is providing new vehicles for my bus routes and hope that one day we’ll have more new buses on the road." 

About the project

SFMTA has recently completed replacement of its aging motor coaches and electric trolleys. The new vehicles, built by New Flyer Industries, include low-floor biodiesel-electric hybrid buses and electric trolley coaches. Muni now has one of the most diverse transit fleets in the world and is also the cleanest multimodal fleet in California.
The Transportation Authority provided nearly $180 million from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation toward the purchase of new Muni buses.
 

Learn more here and here

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Ivy Bennett

Ivy Bennett

Essential Worker Ride Home program

“Everyone always tells me, ‘Thank you for the work that you do,’ but when I found out about this program I really felt like I was being thanked and felt like this city was watching out for me.”

Ivy Bennett

Essential Worker Ride Home program

What’s your connection to this project?

"I’m a residential counselor at a family shelter and I have a work shift that ends at 10 p.m. I usually take the bus home, but sometimes the bus passes me by when there are too many people inside already because of coronavirus guidelines. So this program allows me to call a taxi to take me home without having to worry about the cost." 
 

How has this program improved things for you?

"I'm better at doing my job when I don’t have to stress out about how I am getting back home. Being able to take a taxi ride home gives a lot of peace of mind not only to me, but also to my family because they're worried about me working during this time. Everyone always tells me, ‘Thank you for the work that you do,’ but when I found out about this program I really felt like I was being thanked and felt like this city was watching out for me."

About the project

The Essential Worker Ride Home program, run by the San Francisco Department of the Environment, is an additional resource for essential workers who commute by transit or other sustainable modes, helping to fill the gap left by reductions in public transportation services, especially during evening hours.

The Transportation Authority is supporting the program expansion with $250,000 in funding from San Francisco's voter-approved half-cent sales tax for transportation and other local funding.  
 

Learn more

 

Explore more projects funded by the transportation sales tax on MyStreetSF

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