San Francisco Freeway Corridor Management Study (SF FCMS)

US 101 at Hospital Curve

WHY DO WE NEED TO MANAGE SAN FRANCISCO'S FREEWAYS?

San Francisco’s transportation system faces a critical problem: more people than ever are trying to travel to, from and through the city, and demand is expected to increase. The freeways in San Francisco—US 101 and I-280—play an important role in this network, connecting San Francisco to the Peninsula. Parts of San Francisco’s freeway network are critically congested, but there are many empty seats in cars, vans and buses. 

To support our goals, the Freeway Corridor Management Study is exploring ways to prioritize high occupancy vehicles in the corridor connecting downtown San Francisco to the Peninsula, which would give them a faster, more reliable trip.

The FCMS goals are:

  • Move more people to support economic competitiveness
  • Increase trip reliability
  • Enhance travel choices
  • Enable coordination and integration across jurisdictions
  • Reduce emissions per traveler
  • Achieve and maintain equity, safety, and local neighborhood balance.

WHAT IS A "MANAGED LANE"?

Transit bus in HOV lane

While specific implementation of the managed lane concept varies from one place to the next, all of them have common elements:

  • The managed lane is a lane or set of lanes within the freeway.
  • Examples of operating managed lane projects in the Bay Area include high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) or carpool lanes, high-occupancy toll (HOT) or Express Lanes, or other exclusive or special use lanes, such as bus-only lanes and ramps.
  • A managed lane facility incorporates a high degree of operational flexibility so that over time operations can be actively managed to respond to growth and changing needs.

PERFORMANCE AND BENEFITS

The project team is determining baseline feasibility and the strategy’s performance on key metrics defined by the study’s goals. These metrics include person throughput, vehicle volumes, and expected time savings for managed lane users.

EXISTING CONDITIONS: ROAD CONFIGURATION

Existing conditions: road configuration

Managed lanes are already implemented or planned along the Peninsula:

  • Santa Clara County has 42 miles of HOV lane between Morgan Hill and Redwood City
  • San Mateo County is studying how to continue managed lanes from Redwood City to I-380, near San Francisco Airport

FCMS will do a preliminary assessment of options to extend managed lanes into San Francisco. No project has previously been planned or programmed to extend a managed lane north of 380/101 in San Mateo county or into San Francisco.

EXISTING CONDITIONS: FREEWAY CONGESTION

Existing conditions: freeway congestion

The graphic at right shows typical weekday congestion in the study area, with bottlenecks highlighted.

PROPOSED LIMITS OF MANAGED LANES

Proposed limits of managed lanes

The FCMS team has studied geometric constraints, existing and projected congestion levels, and opportunities to integrate with other planned facilities in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties. The strategy proposes managed lanes from northern San Mateo County to downtown San Francisco via US 101 and the I-280 extension. The strategy focuses on operational strategies and re-striping existing roads in existing rights-of-way, with no significant capital construction or new right-of-way in San Francisco.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

For more information, visit our web site at www.sfcta.org/FCMS or contact Andrew Heidel, Senior Transportation Planner, at 415.522.4803 or via email.

The SF FCMS is funded by Caltrans and the Prop K half-cent sales tax for transportation.

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Top photo courtesy Sergio Ruiz/flickr; photo of bus courtesy Houstontranstar.