19th Avenue Transit Study | About 19th

19th Avenue Study Area map

BACKGROUND

The southern end of the 19th Avenue/State Route 1 corridor, from Sloat to Junipero Serra boulevards, serves heavy volumes of travelers, including pedestrians, bicyclists, the M-Ocean View light rail line, the 17, 28, 28L, and 29 bus lines, and autos (see Study Area map to right). However, conditions for pedestrians and transit operations have been affected by steadily increasing regional through auto traffic and are in need of improvement.

The corridor is also home to one of the City's major activity centers, including the Parkmerced residential development, San Francisco State University (SF State), and the Stonestown Galleria mall. This center features a vibrant mix of uses and is anticipated to grow further, providing an opportunity to contemplate new multimodal transportation improvements.

Infill growth has recently been envisioned for Parkmerced. With it, the development has proposed multiple transportation projects, including realigning the M-Ocean View through the Parkmerced property and modifications to 19th Avenue's travel lanes and intersections. As other nearby sites, including SF State and Stonestown Galleria, continue to refine future plans, there is an opportunity to coordinate a broader look at potential transportation improvements for the corridor.

The San Francisco County Transportation Authority, with grant funds from the State Department of Transportation (Caltrans), is partnering with private and institutional landowners and other city agencies to study a broader set of improvements that would benefit the collective communities including and beyond Parkmerced and whose capital costs would require a collective effort to implement. The goals of these improvements are to:

  • Increase transit service reliability, speed, and capacity
  • Improve local-regional transit connections
  • Reduce vehicle, pedestrian, and bicycle conflicts
  • Manage local and through traffic movement along the 19th Avenue

STUDY PARTNERS AND FUNDING

    • San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency
    • San Francisco Planning Department
    • San Francisco Mayor's Office of Economic and Workforce Development
    • California Department of Transportation (Caltrans)*
    • Parkmerced Investor Properties (Parkmerced)*
    • San Francisco State University (SF State)*
    • General Growth Properties (owners of Stonestown Galleria)*
*Denotes funding partner

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

1. What is the 19th Avenue Transit Study, and why is it being undertaken?

2. Why consider a west-side alignment for the M-Line?

3. How does this study relate to other planning work happening in the corridor?


1. What is the 19th Avenue Transit Study, and why is it being undertaken?

The 19th Avenue Transit Study will identify conceptual designs for transit and non-motorized projects in the 19th Avenue corridor that address existing needs and support potential future land use changes. Infill growth has recently been envisioned for the Parkmerced residential site in the southern part of the corridor. With it, the development has proposed multiple transportation projects, including realigning the M-Ocean View through the Parkmerced property and modifications to 19th Avenue's travel lanes and intersections. As other nearby sites, including SF State and Stonestown Galleria, continue to refine future plans, there is an opportunity to coordinate a broader look at potential transportation improvements for the corridor.

2. Why consider a west-side alignment for the M-Line?

The major activity generators for the M-Line—Parkmerced, SF State, and Stonestown Galleria—are all located on the west-side of 19th Avenue. Currently, M-Line passengers board/alight in the median of 19th Avenue, and cross three southbound travel lanes of 19th Avenue to access their origins/destinations. The Parkmerced Development Agreement calls for a realignment of the M-line segment south of Holloway through the Parkmerced site which would create a new at-grade crossing of the southbound 19th Avenue travel lanes. In order to mitigate the traffic impacts of that at-grade crossing, the Development Agreement calls for a widening of a segment of 19th Avenue. While a grade-separated crossing at Holloway would be cost-prohibitive, grade separated crossings in both the northern (near Sloat/19th) and southern parts of the corridor (near Randolph/Font/Junipero Serra) may be feasible as the benefits and costs could be shared among multiple stakeholders, would eliminate the need to widen 19th Avenue, and may complement additional land use changes envisioned.

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3. How does this study relate to other planning work happening in the corridor?

The Study team is aware of and will coordinate with related efforts that have occurred or are ongoing in the corridor including:

  • Parkmerced Development Project. The Parkmerced development project—approved by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in May 2011—is a comprehensive redesign of the approximately 116-acre site. The project will: increase residential density to encompass a total of 8,900 units on the site, provide new commercial and retail services, provide new transit facilities and improve existing utilities. The 19th Avenue Transit Study will develop transportation improvement concepts that may impact some of the transportation projects that are a part of the Development Agreement between Park Merced Investors and the City and County of San Francisco. After this Study develops and evaluates different improvement concepts, the City and County of San Francisco and Park Merced Investors may amend the agreement to alter the alignment of the segment of the M-line that runs through the Parkmerced property.
  • 19th Avenue Corridor Study. The 19th Avenue Corridor Study was an effort completed by the Planning Department in 2010 at the request of the Board of Supervisors to analyze the collective impacts of potential future developments along and in the vicinity of 19th Avenue. That corridor study used a "four-tier" approach to analyze various sets of existing and proposed land use and transportation changes, including the Parkmerced proposal. Discussions during that study imagined a "Tier 5" set of transportation improvements, including operating the M-Line along the west side of 19th Avenue, as well as improving the transit connection to the Daly City BART Station. The 19th Avenue Transit Study aims to advance discussions on some of these Tier 5 ideas, while addressing a broader set of transportation improvements that would benefit the collective communities including and beyond Parkmerced, whose capital costs would require a collective effort to implement.
  • Transportation Demand Management Partnership Project. The Transportation Authority is currently leading the Transportation Demand Management Partnership Project in partnership with multiple City agencies and private institutional stakeholders to advance the way Transportation Demand Management (TDM) is planned and delivered in San Francisco. One of many activities being undertaken as a part of the TDM Partnership Project is the convening of working groups of employers and institutions, in order to develop and pilot TDM programs of mutual interest such as rideshare, parking management, shuttles coordination, transit pass marketing, and other strategies to decrease drive-alone travel. One such grouping includes the stakeholders of the 19th Avenue Transit Study (Parkmerced, SF State, Stonestown). The activities that will be implemented as a part of the TDM Partnership Project are of a shorter-term nature (within the next 2 years) than those to be developed under this Study (which could take 10 years or longer to implement).
  • BART Daly City Station Access Improvement Plan. BART produced this plan to identify potential transit access improvements to the Daly City BART Station. The plan identified alternatives for expanding the station's busy bus loading area and explored ways in which Muni's M-Ocean View light rail line could approach and serve the BART Station. The 19th Avenue Transit Study will use the BART plan's ideas as a basis for exploring the benefits and costs of bus and light rail improvements to the connection between 19th Avenue and the Daly City BART Station.
  • Transit Effectiveness Project (TEP). The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency's TEP is a program to improve reliability and provide quicker trips for Muni customers. The TEP includes Travel Time Reduction Proposals for routes serving several major transit corridors, including the 28/28L service that runs along 19th Avenue. Changes to bus stop spacing, limited service stops, bus stop relocations, sidewalk extensions/bulbouts, right-turn lanes, and turn restrictions are being considered to improve transit travel time in the corridor. The 19th Avenue Transit Study is a longer-term effort than the TEP. The Study team will coordinate with the TEP team to ensure TEP conditions are reflected and considered in the development of Study design alternatives.

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